Notes for Michel Chion The Voice in Cinema

PROLOGUE RAISING THE VOICE
STRANGE OBJECT
THERE IS NO SOUNDTRACK

Symposia. My symposia project is different because it purports to philosophize with electricity by philosophizing with TCP/IP internetworked electronic computing machinery capable of supporting FOSS. Really focus on Barthes right now listening to Sonic Youth.

(1) From the speech act we usually retain only the signification it bears, forgetting the medium of the voice itself.
Which influenced whom, Chion or Barthes?

(3) These distinctly different triages of sounds emitted from the single real source of the loudspeaker, triages based on the simple criterion of each sound's relation to each image at each moment, already testify sufficiently that there is no soundtrack, put put it provocatively. It is the image that governs this triage, not the nature of the recorded elements themselves.

VOCOCENTRISM

Vococentrism implications to virtual reality generation machines like symposia, which may posit machinic scansion, intelligibility; Weizenbaum, Lyotard and others would argue that disembodied machine cognition cannot share such experience.

(5) In actual movies, for real spectators, there are not all the sounds including the human voice. There are voices, and then everything else. In other words, in every audio mix, the presence of a human voice instantly sets up a hierarchy of perception.
(6) Human listening is naturally vocoentrist, and so is the talking cinema by and large.
WHEN THE CINEMA WAS DEAF
(7) The symbolic date of 1927, the year of
The Jazz Singer, marks the moment when the entire previous cinema was retrospectively declared silent, just as perhaps one day people will talk of the flat cinema. Today's flat cinema dreams of depth; and similarly the so-called mute cinema made spectators imagine the voice, far from denying or mourning its demise.
(8) Still, this spectator who is forced to be deaf cannot avoid hearing voices – voices that resonate in his or her own imagination.
(9) We're no longer allowed to
dream the voicesin fact, to dream period: according to Marguerite Duras, the cinema has “closed off” the imaginary.
(8) Indeed, just about all that the cinema can do structurally with the voice in a cinematic narrative can be found in one film from 1932, Fritz Lang's
Testament of Dr. Mabuse.
LACKING LACK
(10) The early sound film
lacked lack, so to speak; some time had to pass before the magical and cloying effect of hyperrealism would abate, and for the reappearance of the lack necessary for the sound film's full functioning.

Opening for symposia to provide cinematic presentation leveraging never before possible sounds from written symbols.

(11) Today our brains are entirely accustomed to plugging sounds into whatever images we see – sounds whose real localization is much more dispersed and dissociated with respect to what we see.

THE VOICE'S LOSS OF INNOCENCE
(12) As film began to talk the problem was not text: silent cinema had already integrated text through the bastard device of intertitles. It was the voice, as material presence, as utterance, or as muteness – the voice as being, double, shadow, of the image, as a power – the voice as a threat of loss and seduction for the cinema.

ONE THE ACOUSMETRE
A PRIMAL HIDE-AND-SEEK
(17) it wasn't until the twentieth century that Pierre Schaeffer first attempted to develop a language for describing sounds
in themselves.
(17-18) In some ways, film editing has to do with the appearance-disappearance of the mother, and also with games like the “Fort-Da” game to which Freud refers and which Lacan analyzes as a model of the “repetitive utterances in which subjectivity brings together mastery over its abandonment and the birth of the symbol.”
NIETHER INSIDE NOR OUTSIDE
(18) Acousmatic, specifies an old dictionary, “is said of a sound that is heard without its cause or source being seen.”